EEC Merges with AED

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Michelle Galley
(202) 884-8388

Washington, D.C., Nov. 10, 2004 --- EEC, a national, nonprofit organization, has merged with the Academy for Educational Development to form the Educational Equity Center at AED (EEC/AED). EEC brings a 22-year legacy of high quality programs and materials to the Academy, including programs around science equity, gender equity, inclusion, and teasing and bullying.

The new entity is part of the Academy's U.S. Education & Workforce Development Group and is housed in the AED Center for School and Community Services in New York City. EEC/AED's mission is to promote equality of opportunity for all students. Its work in schools and afterschool programs seeks to eliminate the inequities that create barriers to children's learning.

EEC/AED will work to ensure that equity is a key focus within education reform efforts, addressing obstacles that limit student potential to become productive citizens and members of a well-educated and diverse future workforce.

"AED is pleased that EEC has joined us to expand our school and afterschool research, programming, and partnerships with community-based organizations," said Alexandra T. Weinbaum, vice president and director of the AED Center for School and Community Services. "We look forward to building on our mutual strengths in advocating for and achieving educational excellence for all children and youth regardless of race/ethnicity, gender, disability or income levels."

EEC/AED will be launched with three new science equity initiatives funded by the National Science Foundation:

After-School Math PLUS (ASM+) is a three-year project to increase the number of underserved students in grades 3-8 who pursue future education and careers in mathematics. Targeted to students from low-income families who attend afterschool programs, ASM+ is collaboration between EEC/AED, afterschool centers, and local science museums. Students engage in a series of fun, real-world mathematics activities at their centers, work with teenage docents to explore the math in exhibits at the science centers; and learn how to build an exhibit of their own that will be displayed in their local community. Curriculum development, staff development, and parent involvement are key elements of the program.

Science, Gender, and Afterschool: An Online Community of Practice (SGA) will create a unique web-based community of practice to foster connections between researchers, policymakers and practitioners. The overall goal of SGA is to broaden the participation of underserved girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The SGA community of practice will build upon the research-action agenda developed during a September 2002 conference in Washington, D.C. It will deepen and broaden the conference dialogue through online forums, threaded discussions, bulletin boards, and listservs. The site will be accessed through a portal in the website (www.afterschool.org) developed and managed by the AED Center for Youth Development and Policy Research.

Reaching Science and Special Education Teachers: On-Line and In-Person will provide vital information and teaching strategies around inquiry-based science for students with disabilities. The target audience is K-4 science and special education teachers. The overarching goal is to enable students with disabilities in grades K-4 to fully participate in science, learn skill-building activities, and gain positive attitudes about science that may influence later school and career choices. Core activities include professional development seminars offered on-line and at national conferences. The seminars build on Playtime is Science, an NSF-funded, standards-based science activity program that includes modifications for students with disabilities. Project partners are: the Council for Exceptional Children; Science Education for Students with Disabilities, a National Science Teachers Association Associated Group; AED's Disabilities Studies and Services Center and National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities; and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.