EEC History

“When we co-founded EEC, we didn’t know much about running a nonprofit organization. But we did know what was needed: a way to address inequality in education on all fronts–gender, race/ethnicity, disability, and level of family income– beginning with the youngest learners. Over the last 25 years, what began as a vision of equity, and a commitment to pursue it against all odds, has resulted in a body of work that will outlast us.“

- Merle Froschl & Barbara Sprung

  • Educational Equity Concepts (EEC) is founded in December 1982 by Merle Froschl and Barbara Sprung.
  • EEC creates the Women and Disability Awareness Project and publishes Building Community (1983).
  • EEC creates the first nonsexist, multicultural, inclusive early childhood curriculum, Including All of Us (1984).
  • EEC publishes an equity-based early childhood science classroom curriculum, What Will Happen If...Young Children and the Scientific Method (1985).
  • EEC coordinates the Alliance for Mainstreaming Youth with Disabilities (AMYD) to ensure the inclusion of young people with disabilities in New York City after-school programs (1987-1997).
  • EEC launches Playtime is Science, its flagship science education/parent involvement program for grades K-3 that includes modifications for students with disabilities (1997). The program is recognized as a "Promising Gender Equity Program" by the U.S. Department of Education (2000).
  • EEC produces Bridging the Gap: A National Directory of Services for Women and Girls with Disabilities (1998).
  • EEC creates Quit it!, a Teacher's Guide and school-wide intervention model to reduce teasing and bullying in elementary schools (1998).
  • EEC and the New York Academy of Science host a national conference, Early Childhood Science Education and the Workforce of Tomorrow (1999).
  • EEC creates After-School Science PLUS to engage students ages 6 to 14 in inquiry-based science during out of school time (2000).
  • EEC affiliates with the Academy for Educational Development (AED) in December 2000 to form the Educational Equity Center.
  • EEC launches the Raising and Educating Healthy Boys initiative and holds a series of focus groups with preK-3 teachers and parents (2001).
  • EEC and AED host the Science, Gender and After School Conference, in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) (2002), and publish a Research-Action Agenda (2003).
  • EEC implements Quit it! in New York City and Connecticut schools (2003).
  • EEC forms The Science Mentoring Partnership, in collaboration with The River Project, a biology field station located at the Hudson River, and the PS 20 fifth-grade Friday Science Club (2003).
  • EEC and AED hold an invitational meeting for researchers and educators (2004) and produces Raising and Educating Healthy Boys: A Report on the Growing Crisis in Boys’ Education (2005).
  • EEC fully merges with AED in March 2005.
  • EEC/AED launches Science, Gender, and Afterschool: An On-Line Community of Practice to broaden the participation of underserved girls in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). In partnership with AED’s Center for Youth Development and Policy Research, two live webcasts are broadcast nationally (2005-2006).
  • EEC/AED partners with the New York Hall of Science and the St. Louis Science Center to develop After-School Math PLUS, a collaboration between afterschool centers and local science museums where students engage in fun, real-world mathematics activities and learn how to build an exhibit of their own (2005-2007).
  • EEC/AED replicates After-School Math PLUS in four diverse sites across the country (2006-2007) and conducts outreach through Roundtables Advancing the Profession (RAP) in collaboration with the Association for Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) (2008).
  • EEC/AED implements After-School Math PLUS in inclusive afterschool settings (2008).
  • EEC/AED launches Great Science for Girls, a five-year initiative to build the capacity of afterschool centers to deliver programming that will broaden and sustain girls’ interest and persistence in STEM. AED partners for this project are the Center for Youth Development and Policy Research and the National Training Institute for Community Youth Work (2006-2011).
  • FHI 360 acquires the programs, expertise, and assets of AED. EEC remains intact in the New York office and continues its mission and programs.